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David Ward
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   Posted 1/15/2010 6:29 AM (GMT -5)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Following on from the thread at forum.makemusic.com/default.aspx?f=6&m=280600 I was wondering what might be the general view on showing elisions in English. I quite often have these in my vocal lines, but have previously just placed the two vowels under the same note with an appropriate space (option space) whether in MS or with Finale. However I've just tried the Engraver Font Set elision sign in the skeleton (no more) vocal score of an opera in progress and attach a PDF of the appropriate page (see bar 231). Does this look good, or just finicky? I quite like it, but perhaps the elision sign is just a new toy that I don't need!


David Ward
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Dr. Wiggy
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   Posted 1/15/2010 7:14 AM (GMT -5)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Elision is much rarer in English than in languages such as Italian. I'm just trying to think if I have ever seen it in a score.

The tendency for English vowels to be pronounced as dipthongs reduces the incidence of 'vowel-on-vowel' elision. There's a big "W" at the end of "So" that acts as a consonant, dividing the two vowels. "So Wa-fraid". (Depends where you're from, of course!)
Native English speakers tend to be quite poor at 'Italian' vowel elision, often just singing two vowels to halved note values.

Contraction is much more common than elision in English: e.g. "As bitt'r as any gall". "Bless'd is the man", "S'wonderful", etc, and is obviously shown with the apostrophe. In fact, vowel elision is often shown as a contraction: Scorn'd the submissive act, and felt th' o'erwhelming tide!

Though now I think about it, I've sung lots of ropey hymns whose meter doesn't fit the music properly: e.g. "Ever flows their thirst twa-ssuage". But the elision is usually unmarked.

I guess if you want the elision, then the usual elision symbol, the slur, is the right thing to use.


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Post Edited (Wiggy) : 1/15/2010 6:24:08 AM (GMT-6)

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David Ward
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   Posted 1/16/2010 6:36 AM (GMT -5)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Wiggy said...
Depends where you're from, of course!

Just so!

My experience in the UK with classically trained singers is that if their speech has a regional accent they'll use rather Italianate vowels when singing 'posh'. What I'll actually get in performance from this written elision is anybody's guess, but I'll probably keep it as it is for both the full score and the definitive vocal score. This is just a skeleton sketch: there's a long way to go yet, perhaps assisted by a professional typesetter.


David Ward
http://www.composers-uk.com/davidward

Finale 2009c Mac 10.6.2

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Vaughan
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   Posted 1/17/2010 12:17 PM (GMT -5)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
I've never seen this, either. It looks really strange in English and besides, why not (as Wiggy remaked) just put 'so a-' on two 16ths? Is there a musical reason for wanting to notate a single 8th with an elision instead of two syllables under 16ths?


Vaughan

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David Ward
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   Posted 1/17/2010 12:52 PM (GMT -5)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Vaughan said...
why not (as Wiggy remaked) just put 'so a-' on two 16ths? Is there a musical reason for wanting to notate a single 8th with an elision instead of two syllables under 16ths?

Perhaps no very good reason, unless to discourage the 'w' which Wiggy has already mentioned. However, that's probably what I'll get anyway, so perhaps I shouldn't bother. I would, however, prefer semi-arioso singing here, rather than the kind of non-legato bark that might be thought appropriate.


David Ward
http://www.composers-uk.com/davidward

Finale 2009c Mac 10.6.2

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