The original version of this page can be found at : http://forum.makemusic.com/default.aspx?f=5&m=475802
Posted By : Jolora - 5/7/2016 8:55 PM
This is not a Finale question, but I wanted to get opinions from my friends on this site:

My wife is a piano teacher and director of a local handbell choir. Her piano students are all beginners and the handbell choir needs to perform relatively simple pieces. As such, we do a good bit of arranging for both. Oftentimes it is a wholly done arrangement by our own hands of a traditional piece. But sometimes she wants to use a published work as a starting point and pretty much customize it for her use.

When we start with a published work, but make drastic changes (overall key changes, simplify rhythms and/or harmony, change where things go in a modulation, or even combine two or more works into a single piece), she is unsure how to credit this in a printed program. She wants to keep it relatively simple, but also acknowledge that the works as performed are different from the published piece (not to claim any credit, but to avoid confusion).

What would you suggest? I'm asking for how the works should be presented in a printed program, not on the sheet music itself. We always include any copyright notices verbatim on anything based on a published work. And this is all community-based performances. Nothing for profit; we am not selling these "arrangements."


Joe

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Posted By : Jetcopy - 5/7/2016 10:13 PM
IMO, if she makes drastic changes to a piece, basically using the published arrangement as a starting point, then she is the arranger and no further credit is needed. If she feels better giving some credit, the something like "Inspired by John Smith's arrangement of this tune"


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Posted By : **Rimas G. - 5/8/2016 5:13 AM
It's very delicate question. If these arrangements are not for commercial, copyrights owners usualy have no any claims. And second imprtant moment: you never can pretend for money from authors rights agency and official publishers. My last expierence: I get agreement for "The Beatles" arrangements for symphony, but without any my author rights at agency.


**Rimas G.


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Post Edited (**Rimas G.) : 5/9/2016 12:21:29 AM (GMT-5)


Posted By : Richard Ashmore - 5/8/2016 5:51 AM
Jolora said...
This is not a Finale question, but I wanted to get opinions from my friends on this site:

My wife is a piano teacher and director of a local handbell choir. Her piano students are all beginners and the handbell choir needs to perform relatively simple pieces. As such, we do a good bit of arranging for both. Oftentimes it is a wholly done arrangement by our own hands of a traditional piece. But sometimes she wants to use a published work as a starting point and pretty much customize it for her use.

When we start with a published work, but make drastic changes (overall key changes, simplify rhythms and/or harmony, change where things go in a modulation, or even combine two or more works into a single piece), she is unsure how to credit this in a printed program. She wants to keep it relatively simple, but also acknowledge that the works as performed are different from the published piece (not to claim any credit, but to avoid confusion).

What would you suggest? I'm asking for how the works should be presented in a printed program, not on the sheet music itself. We always include any copyright notices verbatim on anything based on a published work. And this is all community-based performances. Nothing for profit; we am not selling these "arrangements."


And this is not a Finale response!

There are two things to consider-
1. Arranging a piece that is subject to copyright- permission is required.
2. Public performance of a piece that is subject to copyright- permission is required.

Whether or not you profit is not relevant. See http://www.mpa.org/content/copyright-search for some guidance.


Richard Ashmore
Finale 2014d v5030
Selmer Radial B-flat Trumpet


Posted By : N. Grossingink - 5/8/2016 10:40 AM
I would suggest you test the waters and email the publisher of one of the pieces you intend to modify and let them know exactly what you want to do. Let them know the information you set forth in your post to this topic. And most importantly, let them know that you have purchased a copy of the music.

Who knows - perhaps they will grant permission for you to use your "re-arrangement". Of course, it might be possible that they'll say "No".

It might be worth considering using arrangements that are more appropriate to the musicians you are both working with, that require no or little modification.

N.


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Posted By : Gareth Green - 5/8/2016 3:30 PM
To back up what others have said, please be careful; I have colleagues who have fallen foul of copyright laws by acting with the most innocent of intentions, and where ignorance of the law has not been considered an excuse. To be honest, posting details of what you have done on a public forum might be considered unwise ...


Gareth J. Green

Fin2014c
Windows 7